Wednesday, February 25, 2009

EMail







Sat. 9/30/06
Hi Tom,
Some valuable info:

I have been talking with grand daughter to Mr. Oresten today, and she told me that Stranne & Oresten Net Making Company was established in the year 1935, in Goteborg (Sweden). They ordered floats from Svenska Glasbruk with their Stranne & Oresten mark on the seal button.

The last years were not good years, and Stranne & Oresten did not produce a lot of floats, and ordered floats without their maker's mark from an unknown east-state glass company. Stranne & Oresten Net Making Company closed in the year 1970.
Per

That was a very interesting email, and historical insight. In the email we have evidence of a company name used as a cachet on a seal button. We learn Stranne & Oresten were the owners of a net making company located in Sweden. And we learn that they had at least three different markings (possibly one float ordered without a marking) on their floats.

Trying to research Svenska Glasbruk, I found numerous websites with the words, "Svenska Glasbruk," but could find no information about the company. It finally occurred to me that "Svenska," might mean "Sweden." Sure enough! When I went to a translation service, the words "Svenska Glasbruk," mean Swedish Glasswork.

Prior to a recent Ebay auction posted by "Swedie," in Sweden, the photo showing the float with the marking, Stranne & Orestan, was unknown. The Stranne Orestan surrounding the "Compass," mark is a well-known cachet. Could it be that the plain "Compass," mark is actually the third float marking from the Stranne & Orestan Net Making Company? Is it the mark that Pereinar123 writes about having been made without the company's mark?

Tonight I am filled with questions, and wonder-where did I put my notes from the night spent pouring over the Glass Lexicon? There are two important pieces of information that I found there. Those notes are around here somewhere!

Thank you David for allowing me to use your photo of the rare Stranne & Orestan float cachet.
Thanks once again to Ken Busse for allowing me to use his photo of the Stranne Orestan Compass float cachet.
The photo of the Compass mark belongs to the author.

8 comments:

  1. Hello again Tom,

    Your blog is great, love it!

    The Stranne & Oresten research in Sweden a long time ago, nearly forgotten that phone call my selves.
    I remember a few emails too about the Stranne & Oresten research, sadly all emails from that period are deleted from a system crash when I was using Microsoft Outlook...I just love Bill Gates Brrrrrrrrrr

    Take care,

    Per

    ReplyDelete
  2. I just want to say that this is great news, and that you are doing a great research Per Einar and Tom.
    Here is a link to an article that says that Svenska Glasbruk AB in Älghult are closing down. It says also that Svenska Glasbruk has an glaswork in Skruv and Bergdala, so it means that Svenska Glasbruk (that means Sweadish Glasworks) are the ovner of more than one glasswork. The article is from 2001

    http://www.nyteknik.se/nyheter/verkstad/verkstadsartiklar/article16938.ece

    Keep up the great work!

    Roger

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great!

    And here is a link from Bjørkshult if anyone will send an email and ask for the history??

    http://www.bjorkshult.se/glasklart/index.htm

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous5:04 AM

    Question: Why is the verbiage on these floats in English when they were made in countries with their own language and where English is not the official language? This occurs with many other products as well. But, it would seem to me that “Made in Xyz” would be displayed in the native language of the manufacturing country. I’m just curious to know why this is.

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