Saturday, June 06, 2009

CLINT'S GREAT FIND







Late this afternoon, a wonderful Ebay auction for a rare European brown amber Lanciotto glass float ended. The float has a unique 6-pointed star on the seal button, and a British Naval Anchor on the top of the float. I've never seen one like it before, and congratulations to the winner of that terrific float.

I wrote the seller Mr. Williams, for additional information, and here is what he wrote:

"It came from the southern part of Newfoundland, Canada. I bought this one with 49 others. Some were marked with, PCF, Clovers, F1, 1 anchor and others without markings. The Lanciotto was the only one I found like it."


Writing about the Lanciotto float seemed appropriate and fitting to add to the original theme for today's post-an incredible find: the first complete European sunturned-amethyst Ship's Wheel float that I have seen or heard of. This is the second example of this float on this blog, and the first one that is a fully intact float.

Perhaps the readers will remember the February post, "How Does It Make You Feel?", which showed the first photos of a partial Ships Wheel float found while on vacation, by a fellow collector and friend, Richard. Richard's float is also sunturned-amethyst.

This second example is a beauty. It was found this winter by a young collector named Clint. His father told me about his son's great good luck, and sent me photos of the float. I wanted to post the float photos and story to the blog right away, but knew that getting permission first was very important.

Just the other day, Clint returned from a long trip, and as he promised he would do upon his return, answered my email in which I asked for his permission to share this wonderful float with other collectors.

Clint is a true gentleman, and a fine young man. He wrote:

"Let me first say that I am honored by the offer to appear on your site! It's kind of a lonely feeling to have the only known complete specimen of this float in my hands--and I appreciate your support. Feel free to post photos, and write about it. It would be really great if someone out there who knows about this mark happened to stumble across your site, and would be willing to share their info. So far, I have only begun to research the history of actual ship's wheels, number of rungs, countries where used, etc. I have a feeling it's going to be a while before I figure out anything worthwhile."

The float was obtained in the Carribean, and as the photos show, still has the sea residue stuck to its body. Man! What a beautiful float!

There is a theory brewing in my mind. Manganese was added to glass mixtures that contained sand with too many iron oxides in it to produce colorless glass. The iron oxides act upon the glass mix causing various shades of color, especially aqua to green. Most authentic European glass fishing floats are green. Some are aqua, amber, and colorless. Then there are the amethyst colored floats, which started out as colorless, but over time and exposure to the ultraviolet rays of the sun, turned the wonderful shades of pink to violet. I am beginning to think that these manganese mixes for floats were produced in one country, and possibly one glass factory. I am leaning toward France as the country of origin.

I have not seen amethyst floats that I can identify with those known to have been made in England, Scotland, Norway, Germany or Sweden. I'm on the hunt, and hopefully will one day have an answer to my theory. As Clint says: "Maybe someone who stumbles across this post will share their knowledge?"

There is an open door in my mind with a welcome mat in front of it. There is anticipation for the information that I seek, and more of these wonderful floats to come through that door. Maybe one or both will join my collection one day?

Congratulations Clint!

The photos of the Lanciotto float are copied from Mr. William's Ebay auction.

Thank you Clint and your Father for sharing this wonderful Ships Wheel float and photos with the readers and I.

The photos of the Ships Wheel float can be enlarged by left clicking your cursor on the photos.

3 comments:

  1. LANCIOTTO FLOAT9:03 AM

    HI EVERYONE , I HAD THE LANCIOTTO FLOAT ON AUCTION . I AM GLAD IT FOUND A GREAT HOME . I ENJOY SEARCHING AND HOPING FOR ANOTHER , IF NOT THAT ONE MAYBE SOME OTHER UNKNOWN . KEEP LOOKING. FROM MR. WILLIAMS

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  2. Very interesting find Clint! and I like your guess for exposure to the ultraviolet rays of the sun Tom. The name Lanciotto is not a typical French name, but the Lanciotto name show up several times in Italy, so I guess this float is made in Italy.

    Per

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